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Army Spc. Angel Laureano holds a vial of the COVID-19 vaccine, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Md., Dec. 14, 2020. (DoD photo by Lisa Ferdinando)
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COVID-19 Vaccine

To link directly to this toolkit from your websites, use this link: [Health.mil/COVIDVaccineToolkit].

The Defense Health Agency developed this digital toolkit to help you communicate with beneficiaries about the COVID-19 vaccine. The assorted print, digital, and social media graphics should be used locally to generate awareness among populations.

  • This communications campaign focuses on raising awareness around vaccine options and resources, targeted at different beneficiary categories.
  • Please check back for new products as this toolkit evolves to meet your local needs.
 

Recent Updates

See Recent Updates

 

Key Messages

Expand the links below to see approved messages on specific topics.

2023-2024 COVID-19 Vaccines

 

COVID-19 and Pregnancy

 

Hybrid Immunity

 

Protection Measures

 

Talking Points

Use these Talking Points to develop local messages about the COVID-19 vaccines.

View Talking Points

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions and Answers about COVID-19.

Q1:

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

A:

You can learn about COVID-19 symptoms at the CDC

Q2:

What is the difference between COVID-19 and the flu?

A:

The flu and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory illnesses. But different viruses causes each. COVID-19 is caused by infection with a new coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. The flu is caused by infection with influenza viruses. >>Learn more.

Q3:

How can I prevent getting sick?

A:

Vaccination is the first tool in your toolbox for respiratory virus season. Additional tools to protect yourself:

  • wash hands with soap and water
  • stay home if you are feeling sick
  • avoid close contact with sick people
  • avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
  • spend time in well-ventilated areas

Practice good health habits, such as cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces, and taking care of your health.

Q4:

Can I get the updated COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

CDC recommends the 2023–2024 updated COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax, to protect against serious illness from COVID-19.

  • Everyone ages 5 years and older should get one dose of an updated COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Children aged 6 months – 4 years need multiple doses of COVID-19 vaccines to be up to date, including at least one dose of updated COVID-19 vaccine.
  • People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised may get additional doses.
Q5:

I didn’t get vaccinated for COVID-19. Can I get the updated vaccine?

A:

Yes, CDC recommends the 2023–2024 updated COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax, to protect against serious illness from COVID-19.

Q6:

Do I need to wait after getting a flu vaccine or another vaccine before getting an updated COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

You can get an updated COVID-19 vaccine at the same visit. This includes the flu vaccine and other indicated vaccines. >> Learn more.

Q7:

I already had COVID-19 and recovered. Do I need to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

Yes. Receiving an updated COVID-19 vaccine can provide enhanced protection against the variants currently responsible for most infections and hospitalizations in the United States.

Q8:

Can I get the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

Yes. CDC recommends the 2023–2024 updated COVID-19 vaccines, Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, or Novavax, to protect against serious illness from COVID-19. Contact your primary care manager or military hospital or clinic for availability. >> Learn more.

Q9:

If I’m pregnant or planning to become pregnant, can I get an updated COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

Yes. The CDC and professional medical organizations, including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, recommend COVID-19 vaccination at any point in pregnancy. >> Learn more.

Q10:

Should my child get the COVID-19 vaccine?

A:

Yes. CDC recommends everyone aged 5 years and older to get one dose of an updated COVID-19 vaccine to protect against serious illness from COVID-19.

  • Children aged 6 months–4 years need multiple doses of COVID-19 vaccines to be up to date, including at least one dose of updated COVID-19 vaccine.
  • People who are moderately or severely immunocompromised may get additional doses of updated COVID-19 vaccine.
Q11:

Where can children get the vaccine?

A:

Military hospitals and clinics who see pediatric patients have the pediatric COVID-19 vaccine. This is available whether or not your child is enrolled. Children who see a civilian provider and don’t want to go to a military hospital or clinic should contact their civilian provider. Also, civilian pharmacies might not administer the vaccine to those 3 years of age and under. We recommend calling ahead to make sure the vaccine is available for this age group.

 

Recommended Social Media Messages

Select from any of these recommended messages and feel free to tailor them to use locally. Add links to information on your website or you can link to www.tricare.mil/coronavirus.

View recommended messages

Approved Graphics

Symptoms of COVID-19

People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. Anyone can have mild to severe symptoms. To learn more, visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

Prevention

Learn CDC’s guidance on how to protect yourself and others at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention.html

Are You at High Risk?

Some people may have a higher risk for severe illness with COVID-19 infection. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html to learn more and use any of the following graphics to communicate about those at a higher risk on your social platforms.

 

At-Home COVID-19 Tests

At-home COVID-19 tests are tests that you can take at home and get your results without sending a sample to a laboratory for testing. These tests are easy to use, produce rapid results, and can be bought over-the-counter if necessary. Learn more about self-tests at www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/testing/self-testing.html.

  • You can take a test at home, even if you don’t have symptoms or are fully vaccinated, in order to make decisions that will help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others. 
  • You should take an at-home test if:
    • You begin to have symptoms of COVID-19
    • You come into close contact with someone who has COVID-19

Test Results

 

Adding Results to the Electronic Health Record

Approved Graphics

Use any of these graphics with the approved social media messages to educate your patients about at-home COVID-19 Test Kits.

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Jul 25, 2023

COVID-19: Underlying Condition List

Graphic explaining the risk of severe illness to COVID-19 under certain medical conditions. Certain underlying medical conditions put you at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19. Severe illness from COVID-19 is defined as hospitalization, admission to the ICU, intubation or mechanical ventilation, or death. Adults of any age with the following conditions are at increased risk of severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19: Cancer; Chronic kidney disease; COPD; Down Syndrome; Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies; Immunocompromised state from solid organ transplant; Obesity; Pregnancy; Sickle cell disease; Smoking; or Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Certain underlying medical conditions put you at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19. Severe illness from COVID-19 is defined as hospitalization, admission to the ICU, intubation or mechanical ventilation, or death.

Infographic
Jul 25, 2023

COVID-19: Increased Risk

You Might be at Increased Risk

COVID-19 is a new disease. Currently there are limited data and information about the impact of many underlying medical conditions on the risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Based on what we know at this time, adults of any age with the following conditions might be at an increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19: Asthma ...

Infographic
Jun 22, 2023

COVID-19: Reduce Your Risk

Graphic explaining how to reduce your risk of getting COVID-19. It is especially important for people with certain underlying medical conditions at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19.  The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to: Limit your interactions with other people; Wear a mask over your nose and mouth; Stay 6 feet away from others; Avoid crowds and poorly ventilated spaces; Wash your hands often; Clean and disinfect; and Monitor your health daily.

It is especially important for people with certain underlying medical conditions at increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and those who live with them, to protect themselves from getting COVID-19. The best way to protect yourself and to help reduce the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 is to: Limit your interactions with other people ...

Infographic
Jun 22, 2023

COVID-19: What to do if You're at Risk

Graphic explaining how to what you should do if you have an underlying medical condition during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you have an underlying medical condition, you should continue to follow your treatment plan. Continue your medicines and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider. Have at least a 30-day supply of prescription and non-prescription medicines. Talk to a healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about getting an extra supply (i.e., more than 30 days) of prescription medicines, if possible, to reduce your trips to the pharmacy. Do not delay getting emergency care for your underlying medical condition because of COVID-19. Emergency departments have contingency infection prevention plans to protect you from getting COVID-19 if you need care. Call your healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your underlying medical conditions or if you get sick and think that you may have COVID-19. If you need emergency help, call 911 right away. If you don’t have a healthcare provider, contact your nearest medical treatment facility or clinic.

If you have an underlying medical condition, you should continue to follow your treatment plan. Continue your medicines and do not change your treatment plan without talking to your healthcare provider. Have at least a 30-day supply of prescription and non-prescription medicines. Talk to a healthcare provider, insurer, and pharmacist about getting an ...

Last Updated: January 09, 2024
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