Skip main navigation

Military Health System

Clear Your Browser Cache

This website has recently undergone changes. Users finding unexpected concerns may care to clear their browser's cache to ensure a seamless experience.

Service Members to Be Surveyed About Health Behaviors

Image of Service Members to Be Surveyed About Health Behaviors. 16th Sustainment Brigade’s Team A conducts physical training around the Baumholder military community in Baumholder, Germany. All active duty and Reserve service members are eligible to receive the 2024 Health Related Behaviors Survey. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Anthony King).

The Department of Defense is fielding the 2024 Health Related Behaviors Survey to nearly 250,000 randomly selected active duty service members. This year’s survey includes questions mental and physical health, substance use, and other health topics related to service member readiness.  

Service members selected to complete the survey will find a link in the inbox for their military email address as it is recorded in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, or DEERS. The survey is sent to a randomly selected group of active duty members across all military branches, pay grades, race/ethnicities, and ages.

Since 1980, the DOD has partnered with third party survey assessors to gauge health-related trends within the force. Typically offered every two or three years, the survey has evolved from focusing strictly on substance use and abuse to a broader look at overall service member health and well-being.

The HRBS is the Department of Defense flagship survey for understanding health, health-related behaviors, and well-being of service members, allowing leaders to better understand the readiness of the force,” said U.S. Navy Capt. Kenneth Richter, director of psychological health for the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness. “Increased participation by service members help develop conclusions that better represent the overall population of the DOD.”

Survey answers are confidential, and a participant's responses are not shared with the Department of Defense or service branches in a way that can identify them.

Echoing Richter’s sentiments on survey participation, Dr. Daniel Evatt, the chief of the research execution section or the Defense Health Agency’s Psychological Health Center of Excellence, emphasized the importance of the survey in understanding the health of the force.

"If members of a particular occupation or demographic group don’t have a high rate of response, then we may not have a very good understanding of the needs of that group,” Evatt said. “ If you are invited to respond, then your answers will help make sure that we understand experiences of service members like you.”

Outcomes

"Some of the major findings from the 2018 survey showed an increase from the 2015 survey in reports of health-related behaviors that are associated with poor outcomes. However, service members’ self-reported behaviors appeared or above general population benchmarks set by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for physical health and functioning, including rates of obesity, frequency of exercise, and high-risk group HIV testing," Richter said.

"The final results [of the survey] are read and used by policy makers, program managers, and researchers, and they can help us direct care where it is needed most,” Evatt said. “Sometimes the findings tell us that a behavior issue is more or less common than previously thought.”

The survey window extends from February to April.

The DOD has partnered with the RAND Corporation, a private research and analysis company, to conduct the survey. Recipients will receive an email from 2024hrbs.com with a survey control number and a link to the welcome page. For more information and an extensive FAQ on the purpose of the survey, recipients are encouraged to visit health.mil/HRBS.

You also may be interested in...

Article Around MHS
Jun 28, 2023

88th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron Focused on ‘Fit to Fight’ Force

Brenda Couch watches over U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Ron Sparkman, a student at the 155th medical group with the Nebraska National Guard, as he checks vitals on an airman during training at Wright-Patterson Medical Center on June 13. Operational Medical Readiness Squadron was this month’s pick for “Dominate the Dirty Work,” a series of stories offering an in depth look at the hard working and dedicated individuals that often go unseen. (Photo: Kenneth J. Stiles, U.S. Air Force)

The 88th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron provides direct support to U.S. Air Force operations by promoting and sustaining force health, preventing injury and illness, restoring health, and elevating human performance. Its top priority is ensuring airmen and military members are medically ready to execute their missions at home-base and deployed ...

Article Around MHS
Jun 15, 2023

24 Nations Unite at Military Nursing Exchange to Enhance USAFE-AFAFRICA Partnerships, Readiness

Polish Air Force Medic, 1st Lt. Marzena Dudaryk, administers Tactical Combat Casualty Care during a simulation session at the U.S Air Forces in Europe - Air Forces Africa European-African Military Nurses Exchange Conference on May 31, 2023.

Nurses and medical professionals from 24 allied and partner nations, including the U.S., converged at the U.S. Air Forces in Europe - Air Forces Africa 2023 European-African Military Nursing Exchange conference, May 31 – June 2, to share medical knowledge and professional best practices with one another.

Article Around MHS
May 31, 2023

Transformed U.S. Army Pharmacy Readiness Training Course Enhances Force Sustainment for Future Combat Operations

U.S. Army Capt Lauren Kaminski of Evans Army Community Hospital, Fort Carson and U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Rosalinda Bermea-Arriaga from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, log controlled substance medications in the pharmacy at the training field hospital at Camp Bullis, Texas. Proper management of controlled substances is vital to the safety, security, and legal compliance of our forces. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Army pharmacists and pharmacy specialists from across the country traveled to Camp Bullis, Texas, this week to participate in a 40-hour deployment readiness course hosted by the U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence. The course is designed to prepare personnel to provide efficient pharmaceutical in an austere, multi-domain, large-scale operating ...

Article Around MHS
May 26, 2023

Walter Reed Expert Shares Five Ways to Prioritize Mental Health

Dr. Diaz discusses the importance of mental fitness with U.S. Army Pvt. 2 Kaliyah Rowan at the Mental Fitness Information table during Staff Resiliency Week at Walter Reed. Diaz says prioritizing mental health is key to building resilience, and shared five ways staff members can do just that in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month. (Photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Jesse Sharpe, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center)

In today's fast-paced health care environment, it's more important than ever to prioritize mental health to build resilience, and in honor of National Mental Health Awareness Month and Staff Resiliency Week at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Dr. Kristine Diaz, a personnel psychologist, shares five ways staff members can prioritize their ...

Article Around MHS
May 22, 2023

New Mental Health Care Initiative Improves Access to Care and Readiness

A room plaque for the 341st Operational Medical Readiness Squadron mental health flight is pictured inside the base clinic June 23, 2021, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana. The mental health flight offers mental health services to active duty members and manages the Family Advocacy and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment programs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heather Heiney)

For more than a year, the Air Force Medical Service has been rolling out Mental Health Targeted Care, an initiative that helps Airmen and Guardians understand all of the available options for support and connects them to the right resource either in a mental health clinic or outside the military hospital with another supporting agency that best meets ...

Article Around MHS
May 5, 2023

Brandon Act Aims to Improve Mental Health Support

The Brandon Act

Gilbert R. Cisneros Jr., undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness, signed a policy today to initiate implementation of the Brandon Act and improve the process for service members seeking mental health support.

Article Around MHS
Apr 17, 2023

Defense Public Health Psychologist Offers Tips to Help Children Cope With Change

Defense Public Health experts say it’s important for parents to maintain a healthy and active attachment with their children by spending at least 20 minutes a day together. This can help military kids and families cope with life changes, like military moves. (Graphic illustration by Graham Snodgrass)

While military kids get to experience many unique and exciting things, they also face many challenges as a result of their parents' service. We've got some expert advice for military parents whose children are adjusting to new schools, separations during their deployments, and other coping skills for military kids to thrive.

Skip subpage navigation
Refine your search
Last Updated: February 09, 2024
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on X Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery